Honey-Hole Feeder from Buckeye Feeders by JoAnn Herbert

The complete Honey Hole feeder ready to go.  Photo Credit:  JoAnn Herbert

The complete Honey Hole feeder ready to go. Photo Credit: JoAnn Herbert

I’ve used various types of feeders in the past, most of them some type of home-made contraption. Feeders can be a useful tool in evaluating the health of the herd and patterning deer.Before investing in any type of feeder, please be sure to check the laws in your area to make sure feeders can be used.

I was able to get my hands on the Honey-Hole feeder by Buckeye Feeders. I found the feeder manageable enough for me to easily get out of the box however don’t let that mislead you. The fully constructed and empty feeder was left to sit in my backyard through several storms and did not topple over. The Honey-Hole feeder is made up of a 35 gallon drum, 3 feeder legs, internal cone, hardware, instructions and the lid with locking ring.

One of three feeder trays that come with the Honey Hole feeder.  Note the holes in the tray that permit drainage and minimize any chance of feed spoilage. Photo Credit:  JoAnn Herbert

One of three feeder trays that come with the Honey Hole feeder. Note the holes in the tray that permit drainage and minimize any chance of feed spoilage.
Photo Credit: JoAnn Herbert

Assembly was straightforward and simple; which is saying a lot since I’m not the first person the family comes running to when something needs to be put together! I did find it was a bit easier to secure the legs with the assistance of another person, but it wasn’t bulky or awkward at all. Being gravity fed, there are no timers or batteries to deal with. Also, no spinner plates to get clogged.

View looking down into the feeder at the internal cone.  The cone is angled so that all feed is diverted to the outlet holes and doesn't clump. Photo credit:  JoAnn Herbert

View looking down into the feeder at the internal cone. The angled cone diverts the feed to the outlet holes and doesn’t clump.
Photo credit: JoAnn Herbert

This particular feeder is able to hold 150 lbs of any type of feed in its 35 gallon barrel. Due to the internal cone, the feed funnels directly to the three feed trays. Don’t worry about feed spoiling inside the trays as each tray is well ventilated.

In the past, I have experienced some problems with moisture getting into the feeder. Everything rotted and smelled sour resulting in a thoroughly unpleasant task of cleaning that mess out, not attracting deer and more than likely driving them away. Due to the fact of those disagreeable memories, I am diligent about checking feeders for moisture. While the feeder was in my backyard, I checked the inside after each of the storms came through my neighborhood; the Honey Hole was dry every time.

You can check out the Honey-Hole feeder and other gravity feeders and accessories available from Buckeye Feeders website at http://www.buckeyefeeders.com. The Honey-Hole feeder has a MSRP of $189 and are made right here in the USA.

Buckeye Feeders logo is the sole property of it’s rightful owner and used within this writing solely for the promotion of products herein as requested by the product’s manufacturer.

Endorsement disclosure: Per the guidelines of the Federal Trade Commission,the products reviewed in these product reviews is an endorsement and the writer may have been compensated by “in-kind” payment to review the product.

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