Mackenzie Walters ~ LIC Hog Hunt

In the state of Ohio, we hunt with shotguns during deer gun season. It is not secret, in fact, I joke that I don’t even know what a rifle is simply because we do not use them. A few years back, my husband and I went on a turkey hunt in southern Alabama. I saw the potential to return to deer and hog hunt and knew I would need a rifle.

Kurt sighting in his rifle. Photo: Mackenzie Walters

Kurt sighting in his rifle.
Photo: Mackenzie Walters

Much research was done in order to purchase a rifle. I wanted a versatile gun, one that could be used for deer, hog, and eventually dream hunts including elk and antelope. I went to a local gun shop with a pretty good idea what I wanted. I explained what I was looking for and the man behind the counter put a gun in my hands.

It was a Savage 11/111 Trophy Hunter XP combo with a Nikon BDC scope in .270 caliber. I debated between the .270 and a .308 but was assured .270 ammunition would be readily available at the time of an ammunition shortage. I bought the gun and a couple boxes of ammo and was on my way. My husband and I sighted the gun in one day only to leave the gun in safe for a couple of years.

An opportunity came to go on a hog hunt with other staff from Ladies In Camo. The gun finally came back out of the safe and onto the range it went. The gun was still shooting accurate with 130 grain soft points. We selected Winchester Razor Boar XT to use on the hunt. I purchased a box to

Pretty good shooting! Photo: Mackenzie Walters

Pretty good shooting!
Photo: Mackenzie Walters

see how they would shoot out of our rifles.

My husband was able to go on the hunt with me. He also shoots a .270. His rifle was sighted in with 150 grain soft points. Much to our surprise, the 130 grain Winchesters shot identical to the loads we were already using. Neither of us had to adjust our scopes.

Before the big hunt, we went back to the range to shoot one more time. We had saved some two liter pop bottles to shoot. We also had some clay targets as well. Kurt shot first at 100 yards. We watched in astonishment as he nailed the target with no problem. I was up next and did the same. Kurt and I each shot again at 100 yards before moving up to shoot free hand. We shot the clay targets at 40 yards off a shooting stick. Both of us crushed the targets and were satisfied with the results.

Off to Alabama we traveled to hunt at Rocky Acres Farm. After a long day of travel, we had dinner with our friends and went to bed for an early morning hunt. I was dropped off first to sit in a shooting house overlooking a well traveled road. Kurt was to sit in a tree stand in a swampy area.

Kurt with his boar! Mackenzie Walters

Kurt with his boar!
Mackenzie Walters

I had just got comfortable in the shooting house before a shot had rung out. It was Kurt. He had a boar waiting on him as he walked into the stand. He sent me a picture of the boar next to another bull Ladies In Camo staff writer Leanne Blasko had harvested a few minutes after Kurt had shot.

Those were the only shots during our three day hunt. Kurt’s shot

Kurt and Mackenzie with Kurt's 180 pound boar. Photo: Mackenzie Walters

Kurt and Mackenzie with Kurt’s 180 pound boar.
Photo: Mackenzie Walters

on the boar was effective. He had shot the boar hog right behind the front shoulder. The shot had exited slightly further back. The hog only went 50 yards after the shot. It takes a lot to put a big old hog down. We were confident with Winchester Razor Boar XT to do the job.

Obviously, we have plans to return to South Alabama for hog hunting again. Winchester Razor Boar XT will be making the trip with us. Being pleased with the ease of sighting the load in and the damage the bullets caused to the hog, it is an easy decision to throw Winchester Razor Boar in the tote with us.

Winchester Razor Back XT in .270 dropped the hog within 50 yards. Photo: Mackenzie Walters

Winchester Razor Back XT in .270 dropped the hog within 50 yards.
Photo: Mackenzie Walters

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